The German Perfekt (perfect tense)

What is the Perfekt and how do we build it? Here we try to sum up everything you need to know about this tense.

The Perfekt, just like the Präteritum, is used to talk about something that happened in the past. In fact, the Perfekt and the Präteritum are often used interchangeably. You could say “Gestern habe ich ein Buch gekauft” or “Gestern kaufte ich ein Buch”. 
The meaning is always the same: “Yesterday I bought a book“.

However, Germans mainly use the Perfekt in everyday oral language, whereas in the written and formal language they prefer the Präteritum.

How to build the Perfekt

The perfect tense (Perfekt) is formed by an auxiliary verb and a past participle (Partizip II). The auxiliary verb can either be “haben” or “sein”, depending on the main verb, and it must be conjugated in the present tense (Präsens) according to the subject. Remember to put the past participle at the end of the sentence.

Ich habe eine E-Mail geschrieben. – I wrote an e-mail.
Sie ist nach Paris geflogen. – She flew to Paris.

Perfekt_rule

 

Past participle: weak, strong and mixed verbs

Weak verbs (schwache Verben)

Weak (regular) verbs build the Partizip II with the prefix GE and the suffix T. These should be added to the verb’s stem. For instance:

SAGEN – GESAGT
KAUFEN – GEKAUFT
LERNEN – GELERNT

If the stem ends in -T or -D we should add an E between the stem and the suffix T:

ARBEITEN – GEARBEITET
WARTEN – GEWARTET
REDEN – GEREDET

If the verb ends in -IEREN we do not use the prefix GE:

TELEFONIEREN – TELEFONIERT
FUNKTIONIEREN – FUNKTIONIERT

 

Strong verbs (starke Verben)

Moving on to strong verbs, their past participle does not follow a general rule. They add the prefix GE and they end in EN, but the stem often changes. For this reason, it is important to learn these verbs’ past participle by heart. A few examples:

FAHREN – GEFAHREN
GEHEN – GEGANGEN
BLEIBEN – GEBLIEBEN
HELFEN – GEHOLFEN
TRINKEN – GETRUNKEN

 

Mixed verbs (gemischte Verben)

Mixed verbs add the same prefix and suffix as regular verbs, but they change their stem:

BRINGEN – GEBRACHT
DENKEN – GEDACHT
WISSEN – GEWUSST
KENNEN – GEKANNT

 

Certain rules apply to both weak and strong verbs. For instance, when it comes to separable verbs, GE has to be put between the prefix and the root.

AUFRÄUMEN – AUFGERÄUMT (weak verb)
MITNEHMEN – MITGENOMMEN (strong verb)
EINSTEIGEN – EINGESTIEGEN (strong verb)

If the verb is non-separable (meaning that the verb has a prefix that never gets separated from it), we do not put GE:
VERSUCHEN – VERSUCHT (weak verb)
BESUCHEN – BESUCHT (weak verb)
UNTERNEHMEN – UNTERGENOMMEN (strong verb)

 

“Haben” or “sein”? Which auxiliary verb should we use?

In most cases, the Perfekt is built with “haben”. Nevertheless, verbs that indicate movement build the Perfekt with “sein”.

Ich bin nach Paris gefahren. – I went to Paris.
Er ist nach Hause gelaufen. – He walked home.
Wir sind zur Party gekommen. – We came to the party.

The same verbs can be used with “haben” when they have a direct object (Ich habe ein Auto gefahren – I drove my car), as well as when the focus is on the activity and not on the movement itself (Er hat eine Stunde gelaufen – He walked for an hour).

 

All reflexive verbs have “haben” as auxiliary verb.

Sie hat sich angezogen. – She got dressed.
Wir haben uns verirrt. – We got lost.

 

In addition, we should consider the verb’s transitivity. Transitive verbs (with direct object) build the perfect tense with “haben”, whereas intransitive verbs usually build it with “sein”.

Ich habe einen Apfel gegessen. – I ate an apple.
Ich bin geblieben. – I stayed.
Was ist passiert? – What happened?

Please note that the same verb can be used both as a transitive and as an intransitive verb.

Das Glas ist gebrochen. – The glass broke.
Ich habe das Glas gebrochen. – I broke the glass.

 

Was hast du gestern gemacht?

If you want to practice, try to list all the things you did yesterday. We gave you some examples.

  • Ich bin aufgestanden. – I got up.
  • Ich habe Brot mit Honig gegessen. – I ate bread with honey.

 

Looking for a German course?

Have a look at our website! Berlino Schule offers German courses with qualified teachers at a very convenient price. Feel free to contact us at info@berlinoschule.com in case you need any information.

Our contacts

Gryphiusstraße 23, 10245 Berlin-Friedrichshain
+49 030 36465765
info@berlinoschule.com
Facebook page
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Perfekt_modal verbs

The German Perfekt and modal verbs: gesagt or sagen?

Building the German Perfekt with modal verbs: the double infinitive

I had to say my name”…

Would you know how to translate this sentence into German? If the answer is no, you may want to keep reading this article. Sure, you can use the Präteritum and say “Ich wollte meinen Namen sagen”, but what if you want to use the Perfekt? In the following paragraphs, we will teach you how to conjugate modal verbs in the perfect tense. You will see, it is easier than you think!

 

A step back: the Perfekt

The perfect tense (Perfekt) is used to speak about an event that took place in the past. This tense is formed by combining an auxiliary verb and a past participle (Partizip II). The auxiliary verb can either be “haben” or “sein”, depending on the main verb, and it must be conjugated according to the subject.

Sie hat gegessen. – She ate.
Er ist nach London gefahren. – He went to London.

 

The Perfekt and modal verbs

Modal verbs can also be conjugated in the perfect tense. If the modal verb is used alone, we build the Perfekt with the auxiliary „haben” and the past participle of the modal verb, just like we have just seen. Again, the auxiliary has to be conjugated to agree with the subject.

Ich habe ein Glas Wasser gewollt. – I wanted a glass of water.
Sie hat Deutschland gemocht. – She liked Germany.

However, when there is no full verb in the sentence, we generally use the Präteritum of the modal verb.

Ich wollte ein Glas Wasser. – I wanted a glass of water.
Sie mochte Deutschland. – She liked Germany.

More often than not, a modal is used with another verb. In order to build the perfect tense, we use a specific structure called the double infinitive. Here is an example:

Ich habe nach Berlin fahren wollen. – I wanted to go to Berlin.

 

The Double Infinitive

Let’s go back to the sentence we were talking about in the first place.
Ich habe meinen Namen sagen müssen. – I had to say my name.

To conjugate modal verbs in the Perfekt, we still need the auxiliary “haben” (conjugated in accordance to the subject). The difference here is made by the two infinitives at the end of sentence. That is why we call this “double infinitive”. In particular, we should put the infinitive form of the main verb first and then the infinitive form of the modal verb.

Remember to always put the two infinitives at the end. If there are some complements, these should be put between the auxiliary and the two infinitives or at the beginning of the sentence.

Ich habe meiner Mutter beim Hausputz helfen müssen. – I had to help my mother clean the house.
Gestern habe ich meiner Mutter beim Hausputz helfen müssen. – Yesterday I had to help my mother clean the house.

double_infinitive_rule

Let’s practice

Was hast du gestern machen müssen? – What did you have to do yesterday?
Und was hast du gestern machen wollen? – What did you want to do yesterday?
Try to answer these two questions using the double infinitive. You can make more than one sentence for each answer.

Examples:
Ich habe gestern lernen müssen. – Yesterday I had to study.
Ich habe gestern lesen wollen. – Yesterday I wanted to read.

 

Learn German with Berlino Schule

Learning German doesn’t have to painful. Berlino Schule’s highly qualified teachers will teach you everything you need to know in a simple way. Our school is rated 4.9/5 on Google and its average reviwe on Facebook is 5/5. If you want to know more about us, have a look at our website. For any information, you can send as an email at info@berlinoschule.com.

Our contacts

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+49 030 36465765
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Konjunktiv II

The German Subjunctive II (Konjunktiv II) explained

Here is a guide to when and how to use the Konjunktiv II in German. Learn and start practicing with us.

Are you struggling to build sentences using the German Subjunktiv II? Don’t worry, we have got you covered. In this article we will teach you when to use the Konjunktiv II and how to build it.

First of all, you must remember that the Konjunktiv II is used to talk about hypothetical situations. It allows us to talk about our dreams and desires, but also to make suggestions or to soften a request.

Konjunktiv II rule

Here are a few examples:

Hätte ich Zeit, würde ich viele Bücher lesen. – If I had time, I would read a lot of books.
• Wir könnten ins Kino gehen – We could go to the cinema. (suggestion)
• Ich hätte gern ein Stück Torte – I would like a piece of cake. (kind request)

There are two ways to build the Konjunktiv II

1. If we want to build the Konjunktiv II of a verb, we start with the stem used in the Präteritum. Then we add the same endings used for the Präteritum.

Ich kaufte (Präteritum) –>  ich kaufte – du kauftest – er kaufte – wir kauften – ihr kauftet – sie kauften (Konjunktiv II)

As you may notice, the Konjunktiv II of weak verbs (like kaufen or sagen) ends up looking exactly like their Präteritum form. Strong verbs and mixed verbs, instead, add an Umlaut (where possible) to their Präteritum stem.

geben – gab – ich gäbe
bringen – brachte – ich brächte

However, for the majority of verbs, we usually don’t build the Konjuktiv II in this way. It is preferable to follow another structure instead (see point 2 below).

 

2. We can also build the Konjunktiv II with the auxiliary “werden”. We just need to learn its subjunctive form:

Ich würde
Du würdest
Er würde
Wir würden
Ihr würdet
Sie würden

Here is how most verbs build the Konjunktiv II:
Würden + infinitive

Ich würde gern eine Pizza essen. – I would like to eat a pizza
Sarah würde gern einen Hund adoptieren. – Sarah would like to adopt a dog.
Was würdest machen, wenn du viel Geld hättest? – What would you do if you had a lot of money?

 

Some verbs don’t build the Konjunktiv II with “würden”

When it comes to auxiliary (haben and sein) and modal verbs, we should use the first form. That means that in these cases we do not use “würde”. Please note that “wollen” and “sollen” do not want the Umlaut.

Ich hätte
• Ich wäre
• Ich möchte – ich könnte – ich dürfte – ich müsste – ich wollte – ich sollte

There are also a few irregular verbs, whose Konjunktiv II is often built starting from the Präteritum. These are:

• gehen – ging –> ich ginge
• kommen – kam –> ich käme
• wissen – wusste –> ich wüsste
• finden – fande –> ich fände
• lassen – ließ –> ich ließe
• schlafen – schlief –> ich schliefe

 

Konjunktiv II in the past

So far so good… now let’s move on the past form. There is nothing to be scared of, if you remember how to build the Perfekt. Instead of using the present form of the auxiliaries haben and sein, you just have to switch to their subjunctive form. For instance:

Perfekt: Ich habe mein Zimmer aufgeräumt. – I tidied up my room.
Konjunkitv II – past tense: Ich hätte mein Zimmer aufgeräumt, (wenn ich Zeit gehabt hätte). – I would have tidied up my room, (if I had had time).

Perfekt: Ich bin nach Paris geflogen. – I flew to Paris.
Konjunkitv II – past tense: Ich wäre nach Paris geflogen. – I would have flown to Paris.

 

Things get a little more complicated when you have to build the past tense of the Konjunktiv II with modals. In this case, you should use the following structure:

Hätten + infinitive + infinitive of the modal verb (hätten + double infinitive)

Ich hätte das Abendessen kochen müssen. – I should have cooked dinner.
Peter hätte nach Österreich fahren können. – Peter could have travelled to Austria.

 

It is important to remember that we should always use the auxiliary “haben”, even if we would have used “sein” for the Perfekt (see: “er ist gefahren” vs “er hätte fahren können”).

 

Let’s practice!

Was würdest du machen, wenn du reich wärst? – What would you do if you were rich?

Ich würde einen Urlaub auf den Malediven machen – I would go on vacation to the Maldives
Ich würde ein Haus am Meer kaufen – I would buy a house by the see

Und du? Was würdest du machen? And you? What would you do?
Try to list at least three things that you would do if you were rich.

 

Was würdest du tun, wenn du keine Angst hättest? – What would you do if you had no fear?

Ich würde in eine neue Stadt umziehen. – I would move to a new city.
Ich würde Bungee Jumping ausprobieren. – I would try bungee jumping.
Ich würde vor Publikum singen – I would sing in front of an audience.

Now try to list three things you would do if you had no fear.

 

Would you like to keep learning German?

Berlino Schule offers German courses from A1 to C1. Our certified teachers are waiting for you!

Berlino Schule has the best quality-price ratio (check the reviews online, 4.9/5 on Google and Facebook). Click here to access the calendar and reserve your place by simply sending an email to info@berlinoschule.com.

Our contacts

Gryphiusstraße 23, 10245 Berlin-Friedrichshain

+49 030 36465765

info@berlinoschule.com

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classe Berlino Schule

Studying German in summer at Berlino Schule: 50 hours in 2 weeks for €268, excellent quality (5/5 on Facebook) and extra activities

Many different levels of German courses in Summer.

Our students continue to come back to Berlino Schule time and time again and this is evident through the excellent five star reviews we have received (see Facebook and Google). These positive reviews are due to the consistent quality of our teaching and our competitively low prices. In fact, our students claim to have been positively stimulated by our international, young and dynamic atmosphere. Find our latest offers below which are all available in the upcoming months.

Superintensive courses

In August Berlino Schule will offer super-intensive courses. They last 2 weeks (50hours* in total) every day from Monday to Friday and cost €268 which includes up to 15 hours of complementary activities, such as guided tours and film screenings!

Our teaching method

Every course is taught in German, i.e. our teachers constantly speak the language that our students want to learn when delivering lessons or explaining concepts even if it’s a basic course. Our method relies on the belief that a total immersion in the language is the most effective way to improve one’s level. Our teachers have regular meetings to ensure the consistency of our method, regardless of the level of each course.

Choose the best course for you!

SUPER INTENSIVE (SUMMER SCHOOL) COURSES 268€ for 2 weeks

2 weeks of morning or afternoon classes, 5 hours of lesson per day, four times a week, 50 hours* in total.

Upcoming German courses

AUGUST

Super intensive courses (Summer School) – €268

A1.1: 13 AUGUST – 24 AUGUST (Mon- Fri 14:00- 18:15)

A1.2: 13 AUGUST – 24 AUGUST (Mon- Fri 9:15- 13:30)

A2.2: 13 AUGUST– 24 AUGUST (Mon-Fri 9:15-13:30)

B1.2: 13 AUGUST – 24 AUGUST( Mon- Fri 9:15-13:30)

B2.2: 13 AUGUST – 24 AUGUST (Mon – Fri 14:00-18:15)

SEPTEMBER

Super intensive courses (Summer School) – €268

A1.1: 27 AUGUST- 7 SEPTEMBER ( Mon- Fri 9:15-13:30)

A1.2: 27 AUGUST – 7 SEPTEMBER (Mon – Fri 14:00-18:15)

A2.1: 27 AUGUST- 7 SEPTEMBER (Mon- Fri 9:15-13:30)

A2.2: 27 AUGUST – 7 SEPTEMBER (Mon – Fri 14:00-18:15)

B1.1: 27 AUGUST – 7 SEPTEMBER (Mon- Fri 9:15-13:30)

C1.1: 27 AUGUST – 7 SEPTEMBER (Mon – Fri 14:00-18:15)

learn German in Berlin

Accommodation

Should you need any help to find a place to stay while attending your course, send us an email! Berlino Schule has concluded agreements with some flat tenants in Berlin and can put you in touch with them or provide you with a list of hostels and hotels with fair prices which are close to the school.

Where

At Berlino Schule, in Gryphiusstr. 23, in Friedrichshain, one of the best, safest and most lively areas in Berlin. Moreover the school is within walking distance of the East Side Gallery (the longest segment of the Berlin Wall still standing), one of the main touristic attractions of the capital city.

Info & Registration

Should you need further information or want to register for one of the above-mentioned courses, feel free to contact us at info@berlinoschule.com or call us +49 (0)30 36465765!

Course calendar

Berlino Schule offers courses for everyone: intensive, evening and conversation ones. The whole language offer is available on the official school website.
Consult here the complete German courses calendar of Berlino Schule.

Intensive classes will start again from September

Intensive classes at Berlino Schule are composed by 4 weeks of morning classes, 3 hours of lesson per day, four times a week, 48 hours* in total for a cost of 192€ (plus 20 € if it’s your first time at Berlino Schule). There are not extra activities included like in the super intensive classes.

Intensive courses – €192

A1.1 11 SEPTEMBER – 5 OCTOBER (Tue-Fri 8.45 – 11.15)

A1.2 11 SEPTEMBER – 5 OCTOBER (Tue-Fri 11.40 – 14.10)

A2.1 11 SEPTEMBER – 5 OCTOBER (Tue-Fri 8.45 – 11.15)

B1.1 11 SEPTEMBER – 5 OCTOBER (Tue-Fri 11.40 – 14.10)

B2.1 11 SEPTEMBER – 5 OCTOBER (Tue-Fri 8.45 -11.15)

C1.1 11 SEPTEMBER – 5 OCTOBER (Tue-Fri 11.40 – 14.10)

Evening courses – €240

A1.1 10 SEPTEMBER – 31 OCTOBER (Mon and Wed 19.15  – 21.40)

A2.1 11 SEPTEMBER – 1 NOVEMBER (Tue and Thu 19.15  – 21.40)

B1.1 10 SEPTEMBER – 31 OCTOBER (Mon and Wed 19.15  – 21.40)

B2.1 11 SEPTEMBER – 1 NOVEMBER (Tue and Thu 19.15  – 21.40)

C1.1 10 SEPTEMBER – 31 OCTOBER (Mon and Wed 19.15  – 21.40)

Skype lessons

Berlino Schule gives you the opportunity to study German directly from home thanks to our teachers and the private lessons conducted via Skype. We aim at making education accessible to everyone, even those not living in Germany or even those who cannot attend the school. Our individual and Skype classes are made for beginners (A1.1) as well as advanced learners (C1) and the other levels. An attendance certificate will be given to you at the end of your eLearning classes. If you want to take individual classes, no previous knowledge is required. Our flexible schedule will meet your specific linguistic needs and working hours. The attendance will be defined with the school. The price is €28 per hour (45 minutes). Send to us your application and you will have the chance to attend lessons comfortably from home. Contact us at info@berlinoschule.com for further information.

*As defined by the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) and applied to all language schools, one hour of lesson consists of 45 minutes.

 

The winners of the photocontest #quantoèbellaberlino

Today the photocontest #quantoèbellaberlino ended and we have selected the three winners! The prizes were a German course at Berlino Schule, a dinner for two at MedEATerranean Trip and an artisan bier tasting with apetizers at Birra.

Summer School

The Summer School courses are super-intensive German courses that last two weeks and take place from July to September. They consist of 5 -hour*  daily classes, from Monday to Friday, for a total amount of 50 hours*. The atmosphere is very friendly and the teachers certified and experienced. Here the information about the next courses.

The first winner has the possibility to take a course for free and complete a semi-level in just two weeks!

The contest

The photo contest aimed to represent Berlin and highlight its beauty. Of course there were the Berliner Dom, the Siegessaule and the Brandeburger Tor.

The final ranking

We have selected the final winners taking into consideration the likes each photo had on 2nd of July at 12:00.

The first place: with 1117 likes the winner is Elisa Pozzi with her photo Back to the 90ies.

The second place: with 613 likes Lorenzo Sartori wins the second prize with his picture Berlino è più forte della realtà.

The third place: with 176 likes Maria Stefania Atzori wins the third prize with her photo Duomo di Berlino.

Here the photo album of the contest #quantoèbellaberlino on Berlino Magazine’s Facebook page to enjoy the pictures of the German capital.

To claim the prizes send an email to info@berlinoschule.com

 

Learn German in Berlin

Studying German in July in Berlin: superintensive, intensive and evening courses from €4/h. Excellent quality (5/5 on Facebook) and international atmosphere

Many different levels of German courses in July as well as the whole summer.

Summer is coming but Berlino Schule isn’t closing its doors. Our latest online reviews (both on Facebook and Google) reward us with 5/5 stars, thanks to the quality of our teaching and our low prices. Our students claim to have been positively stimulated by our international, young and dynamic atmosphere. Find below our offer for the next months.

Intensive, superintensive and evening courses

From July until September, along with our regular intensive and evening courses, we will also offer superintensive courses. These last 2 weeks each (50hours* in total) and cost €268. Thanks to this type of course, you could be able to complete a whole level within a month! Moreover, our superintensive courses are part of our Summer School project, which includes up to 15 hours of complementary activities, such as guided tours and film screenings!

Our teaching method

Every course is taught in the target language, i.e. our teachers constantly speak the language that our students want to learn when delivering their lessons or explaining the concepts. Our method relies on the belief that a total immersion in the language is the most effective way to improve one’s level. Our teachers have regular meetings to ensure the consistency of our method, regardless of the level of each course.

Choose the most suitable course for you!

INTENSIVE COURSES

4 weeks of morning classes, 3 hours of lesson per day, four times a week, 48 hours* in total.

SUPER INTENSIVE (SUMMER SCHOOL) COURSES

2 weeks of morning or afternoon classes, 5 hours of lesson per day, four times a week, 50 hours* in total.

EVENING COURSES

2 months of evening classes, 2 hours per day, 2 times a week, 48 hours* in total.

 

Upcoming German courses in July

JULY

Super intensive (Summer School) 268€ for 2 weeks

Morning

B1.1: 2 JULY – 13 JULY ( Mon- Fri 9:15-13:30)

B1.2: 16 JULY – 27 JULY ( Mon- Fri 9:15-13:30)

Afternoon (2.00-6.15 pm)

A2.2: 16 JULY – 27 JULY (Mon – Fri 14:00-18:15)

B2.1: 2 JULY – 13 JULY (Mon – Fri 14:00-18:15)

B2.2: 16 JULY – 27 JULY (Mon – Fri 14:00-18:15)

Intensive courses €192 for 4 weeks

A1.1: 3 JULY – 27 JULY (Tue – Fri 8:45 – 11:15)

A1.2: 3 JULY – 27 JULY (Tue – Fri 11:40 – 14:10)

A2.1: 3 LUGLIO – 27 JULY (Tue – Fri 8:45 – 11:15)

A2.2: 3 JULY – 27 JULY (Tue – Fri 11:40 – 14:10)

Evening Courses 248€ for 8 weeks

A1.1: 3 JULY – 23 AUGUST (Tue and Thu, 19:15 – 21:40)

A1.2: 2 JULY – 22 AUGUST (Mon and Wed, 19:15 – 21:40)

A2.1: 3 JULY – 23 AUGUST (Tue and Thu, 19:15 – 21:40)

A2.2: 2 JULY – 22 AUGUST (Mon and Wed, 19:15 – 21:40)

B1.2: 3 JULY – 23 AUGUST (Tue and Thu, 19:15 – 21:40)

learn German in Berlin

AUGUST

Super intensive courses (Summer School)

Morning

A1.1: 30 JULY – 10 AUGUST (Mon- Fri 9:15- 13:30)

A1.2: 13 AUGUST- 24 AUGUST (Mon- Fri 9:15- 13:30)

A2.1: 30 JULY- 10 AUGUST (Mon- Fri 9:15- 13:30)

B1.1: 30 JULY – 10 AUGUST ( Mon- Fri 9:15-13:30)

B1.2: 13 AUGUST – 24 AUGUST( Mon- Fri 9:15-13:30)

Afternoon (2.00-6.15 pm)

A1.1: 13 AUGUST- 24 AUGUST (Mon- Fri 14:00- 18:15)

A1.2: 30 JULY- 10 AUGUST (Mon-Fri 14:00- 18:15)

B2.1: 30 JULY – 10 AUGUST (Mon – Fri 14:00-18:15)

B2.2: 13 AUGUST – 24 AUGUST (Mon – Fri 14:00-18:15)

SEPTEMBER

Morning

A1.1: 27 AUGUST- 7 SEPTEMBER ( Mon- Fri 9:15-13:30)

A2.1: 27 AUGUST- 7 SEPTEMBER (Mon- Fri 9:15-13:30)

B1.1: 27 AUGUST- 7 SEPTEMBER (Mon- Fri 9:15-13:30)

Afternoon

A1.2: 27 AUGUST-7 SEPTEMBER (Mon – Fri 14:00-18:15)

A2.2: 27 AUGUST-7 SEPTEMBER (Mon – Fri 14:00-18:15)

C1.1: 27 AUGUST-7 SEPTEMBER (Mon – Fri 14:00-18:15)

Accommodation

Should you need any help to find a place to stay while attending your course, send us an email! Berlino Schule have concluded agreements with some flat tenants in Berlin and can put you in touch with them or provide you with a list of hostels and hotels with fair prices which are close to the school.

Skype lessons

The language school “Berlino Schule” is located in Berlin and gives you the opportunity to study German directly from home thanks to our teachers and the private lessons conducted via Skype. We aim at making education accessible to everyone, even those not living in Germany or even those who cannot attend the school. Our individual and Skype classes are made for beginners (A1.1) as well as advanced learners (C1) and the other levels. An attendance certificate will be given to you at the end of your eLearning classes. If you want to take individual classes, no previous knowledge is required. Our flexible schedule will meet your specific linguistic needs and working hours. The attendance will be defined with the school. The price is €28 per hour (45 minutes). Send to us your application and you will have the chance to attend lessons comfortably from home. Contact us at info@berlinoschule.com for further information.

Where

At Berlino Schule, in Gryphiusstr. 23, in Friedrichshain, one of the best, safest and most lively areas in Berlin. Moreover the school is within walking distance of the East Side Gallery (the longest segment of the Berlin Wall still standing), one of the main touristic attractions of the capital city.

Course calendar

Berlino Schule offers courses for everyone: intensive, evening and conversation ones. The whole language offer is available on the official school website.
Consult here the complete German courses calendar of Berlino Schule.

To enroll and have more information, don’t hesitate in contacting us at: info@berlinoschule.com or visit our website.

*As defined by the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) and applied to all language schools, one hour of lesson consists of 45 minutes.